Our Creation (poem)

The souls thunder is a memory of defeat

From the enemy that portrayed the darkest hour

It crushes, rejects, the opinions of those who care

For the purpose of money & for the purpose of war

A delicate world on the brink of collapse

Sins magnified and ignorance replenished

The destruction of death

Until it’s too late to make change

We will never know

What peace feels like in the brink of madness

Because selfishness is destructive and may encapsulate your deepest fears

Love is the opposite, therefore opposites attract

Do not compare, or argue with a broken soul

Understand and help them instead

To learn from another is to be re-born

To create a simple future

And a positive world

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Shakespeare wrote about narcissm 🎭

I was analysing some brilliant works composed by Shakespeare and realised that in one of his plays, Macbeth, Macbeth had murdered three people that affected Lady Macbeth and deteriorated her mental health. Her mental health rapidly declined.

This was going back when social media, photographs and television sets weren’t invented yet. Shakespeare wrote about narcissm and the affects of mental health in his own unique language from his own perspective. What happened to Shakespeare’s lost play? What did he experience in his life for him to write? All this is highly interesting in looking at the evolution of psychological behaviours. This is a pure example of how we can combine science with creativity and converge these sectors together.

Narcissists have no issue with death or killing others for personal gain, sense of control or power. If anyone protests against a real narcissist there will be social war and extreme velocity. They can remain calm and stable because their emotions are tucked away in the iceberg of their traumatic history. They are charming at face value and can use language to manipulate their victims into giving in to their demands.

Normal people don’t believe such psychopathy exists because they blend in. That’s the true meaning of narcissm.

Using the environment to describe mental health💙

6A9D8BEF-6C91-4473-8A93-A64DAE08D7C7.jpegDeveloping skills 📝

I took some rather splendid photographs of Central London this week for my research portfolio which I plan to use to describe mental health using the environment as a visual perspective.

How does this work? 

You travel to a place that means something to you personally. It can be local, abroad, or even in your own home.

You take a photograph of that place. They say every picture speaks a thousand words! 

So what do we do next . . .

Any ideas? 

1. Look at the photograph above. Just look at it. Take in all the information visually. Really feel the historical vibe and the patterns of Shakespeare’s famous Globe Theatre. What does the photograph represent? Imagine what you believe is inside that building. This is an exercise designed to look at our inner selves and is a critical thinking exercise. Everyone will have a unique perception of what they feel would be inside. . . So really take a look at it. What does the building mean to you?

How does this relate to mental health do you ask?

This is when we come to step two:

2. Write down all the emotions and feelings you believe this building contains within its frame work. Write down what you believe inspired the architects to design this building in a certain way.

3. What did you learn from doing this exercise?

💙

The broken moon 🌒

What is the meaning of an eclipse?

Is it a partial disturbance of evil covering the light of the stone’s soul?

What is the meaning of night?

Is it to rest our bodies or minds?

What is the meaning of the holes on the moons surface?

Does it emphasise the holes we carry within our hearts?

What is the meaning of a broken soul?

An awareness that there’s a missing piece – a missing part of you that you can’t comprehend. . .

But it’s always the same moon. The same moon we all look up to.

Ernest Hemingway’s Mind

Ernest Hemingway once said: “There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self”

What does this quote imply?

Ernest Hemingway struggled with depression at the time he wrote this quote. You can tell by his words. The first sentence shows he probably tried to explain how he was feeling but came across as insensitive and superior and couldn’t understand why no one else could understand the way he was feeling.

The second part of the sentence implies his own personal growth within his writing. He released his emotions into words, he created books that warmed the hearts of millions of people around the world – especially the book “The Old Man and the Sea.”

He remembered who he was before all the traumatic incidents happened to him except he knew something in his brain has changed. He knew because he became superior to himself. He may have come across as narcissistic but maybe society suppressed him too much, so was he? Maybe the experiences he entailed changed the way in which is brain functioned. Maybe he didn’t realise how much of himself he lost until the moment he could write. He wrote about what hurts. His imagination will always live on.